All posts tagged: cayman national trust

Eco Mad hatter Hats

                  Last weekend, The National Trust for the Cayman Islands hosted an awesome 5K Glow Run!! “Light up the night for a brighter future” In the spirit of this fundraising event one of my bestie’s and I joined in with other participants creating funky glow costumes.  We made “Mad Hatter Hats” which of course, had an environmental theme.  One was nature themed, the other ocean themed.  In addition, we added some glow accessories, funky shades, and faux/synthetic feathered boas (which can be recycled for other events). How to make Eco Mad Hatter Hats What you will need: Plastic black top hats (repurposed New Year’s Eve hats), cardboard, faux flowers, faux/synthetic feathers, toilet paper rolls, postcard, sea fan, glow in the dark stickers, glow paint (non-toxic), glue gun. “Dear Verdant Island” The Cayman Islands Blue Iguana was the mascot for this hat 🙂 Made out of cardboard, (repurposed pizza box). Written below the Blue Iguana, is lyrics from the Cayman Islands National Song “Dear Verdant Island.”  Some faux flowers …

Silver Thatch: Cayman’s National Tree

Our beautiful island that is set in the deep blue Caribbean Sea, is graced with a handful of majestic trees, such as the Cayman Logwood, Mahogany and Silver Thatch Palm.  The Silver Thatch Palm is Cayman’s sacred national tree.  A unique tree which is indigenous to Cayman.  I find that there is a greater abundance of Silver Thatch on the eastern side of the island.  It is a spectacular view to see the Silver Thatch palms swaying in the refreshing sea breeze, untouched, scattered along the remote and undeveloped areas in East End and North Side. When I hear the words Silver Thatch the first thing that comes to mind is Caymanian Heritage.  I think of the wonderful items handcrafted by Caymanians such as Silver Thatch, baskets, hats, fans and rope.   Back in the olden days Silver Thatch had two primary uses, such as: making thatch rooftops and rope.   A thatch roof would last up to 5-6 years.  There is an old folklore claiming that the thatch palms would be harvested during the night of …

Where The Mangroves Grow…

Mangroves are integral to our ecosystem as they provide a home to juvenile fish, baby turtles and baby lobsters, as well as the West Indian Whistling Duck, White Egrets and our national icon, the Cayman Parrot.  Mangroves not only provide a safe area for fish, crustaceans and birds it also acts as a natural sea wall or barrier protecting our coastline during hurricanes and other storms which pass through our waters.  Perhaps an overlooked benefit of the mangroves is the fact that our Central Mangrove Wetland contributes to rainfall which largely graces areas like George Town and West Bay, which is “40% greater than in the eastern districts” and without this rainfall those areas would not be as blessed with an abundance of healthy trees and vegetation, instead would be dry and have poor soil (National Trust).  The Central Mangrove Wetland covers a total of 8,500 acres, and in a sense it can be considered as our version of a rainforest so to speak.  The Central Mangroves Wetland acts like a rainforest by saturating the …