All posts tagged: plastic

Sage Larock: Making Waves With Sustainable Fashion

Taryn Sage Larock is making waves in the fashion industry.  As a former model and now fashion designer, her passion for fashion and dedication to ocean advocacy reflects in her modern sustainable luxury collection of swimwear and apparel.  Her collection is “clothing that is naturally beautiful both inside and out” it is entirely sustainable, ethically made, animal cruelty free and made with the ocean in mind.  Sage Larock offers limited edition pieces that have a timeless and classic appeal.  At the heart of her clothing line is staying authentic to her love for the ocean by ensuring all of her pieces are made in both a sustainable and ethical manner.  A key component to her swimsuit collection and apparel is that they are made from “sustainable fabrics such as organic OEKO-TEX® certified cotton, Italian recycled poly fabric, which is made of recycled fishing nets and plastic debris recovered from the ocean, and extra soft hemp jersey, which is grown and produced without any chemicals” highlighting eco-friendly options that transcend and create sustainable luxury fashion. Sustainability …

Moonlight Screening: A Plastic Ocean

  Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation and the Cayman Islands Department of Environment is hosting a moonlight screening featuring the documentary A Plastic Ocean, Tuesday 7 November at 7pm in Camana Bay’s Gardenia Court. Snowcones and popcorn will be available for purchase and all proceeds will go to Guy Harvey‘s Ocean Foundation.  A Plastic Ocean is a film that candidly shows the magnitude of plastic polluting our oceans and threatening marine life. Ocean plastic is a growing epidemic contaminating the balance of the ocean, entangling marine life and often being mistaken as food by marine life, mammals and birds resulting in their death. “In the center of the Pacific Ocean gyre our researchers found more plastic than plankton. A Plastic Ocean documents the newest science, proving how plastics, once they enter the oceans, break up into small particulates that enter the food chain where they attract toxins like a magnet. These toxins are stored in seafood’s fatty tissues, and eventually consumed by us.”- A Plastic Ocean A Plastic Ocean is a powerful film. It is a wake up …

Turning the Tide on Plastic

It is becoming more evident that as consumers we have an addiction to plastic and it is a habit that is in desperate need of breaking. Plastic is an escalating problem globally. In particular, single-use plastics such as bottle caps, plastic bags, straws and so on are more frequently being found in our oceans or tangled around or ingested by marine life. Micro-plastics are another major component of ocean pollution. Plastic products that are not recycled end up somewhere and that could be in landfills or as debris polluting the environment, rivers, lakes, and oceans which is problematic. Somewhere along the way the ocean has become a trash can, and it was never intended or designed to be one. Our oceans serve as a home to marine life, coral reefs and ecosystems all of which depend on a healthy ocean for their survival— we depend on a healthy ocean for our survival. We view the ocean as this indestructible resource, however, even the ocean has its limits and plastic pollution disrupts the health of the …

Plastic, Caught In Our Blind Spots

Christine Ren, is making waves with her thought provoking art, drawing attention to environmental issues.  Her piece entitled, “Blind Spots” is mind blowing.  A satirical piece, sparking conversation about environmental concerns as it makes an interesting commentary on society’s consumption of plastic.  The portrait of a girl blindfolded with a shopping cart full of plastic products that are cascading out of the cart and into the ocean, is perfectly constructed to highlight society’s behavior in terms of not taking ownership or responsibility for the massive accumulation of plastic that has over years been dumped into the ocean.  It shows how easy it is for society to lose sight of critical environmental issues that are right in front of us and problems that are increasing.  And, if not lose sight of a glaring issue, the ease and ability we have to push it out of our minds or into our blind spots to avoid dealing with it. Christine’s art forces us to stare at the blatant issue of plastic pollution and face the reality of a …

One Man’s Trash, Is Another’s Recycled Art

Marc Laurenson, local artist and cofounder of Stoak’d Cayman, is starting a new art movement in the Cayman Islands.  He is bridging his passion for art with conservation.  Specifically, he is repurposing materials that would have otherwise ended up in the landfill or recycle bins (depending on the product) into his canvas and transforming trash into bold artwork. One of his pieces in his new collection was constructed entirely from Coca Cola products.  Another, was made from Heineken products.  Marc’s newly inspired artwork, creates great statement pieces and an interesting commentary on consumerism.  It illustrates the impact marketing and advertising have on our society.   Consumerism has essentially become a major component of our culture.  We are constantly bombarded with marketing and advertisements pushing us to buy more, consume more products.  Marc’s artwork made entirely of consumer products forces us to examine the amount of products we consume and purchase on a daily basis.  Moreover, it highlights the urgency there is for us all to collectively make the effort to recycle, repurpose or reuses products …

The Ocean Is Not A Trash Can

(Photo Credit: CBS News) Spolier Alert: The ocean is not a trash can. Did you know? There’s six times more plastic than phytoplankton in all oceans, and according to the UN Environmental Programme a minimum of 46,000 floating pieces of plastic for every square kilometer of Earth’s oceans in their entirety. -Huffington Post Unfortunately, the ocean is increasingly becoming a common dumping ground for trash.  Plastic and other trash keeps making its way into the ocean and wreaking havoc on marine life.  In particular, plastic is a major concern. When marine life ingest what is known as micro-plastics they can die as a result.  Additionally, plastic poses other threats to marine life, such as causing animals to become entangled or strangled by nets and plastic 6-pack soda rings. Sadly, marine life are becoming victims of man’s carelessness of polluting the ocean.  Ocean pollution not only harms and endangers marine life but it also disrupts the balance of the health of the ocean.   (Photo Credit: One Green Planet) The Dangers of Plastic and Other Trash Floating …