All posts tagged: sharks in the cayman islands

Welcome To Sharkphoria

What is Sharkphoria? Sharkphoria is a science based Patreon channel dedicated to creating shark awareness and to share marine biology content through videos. The person behind Sharkphoria and creator of the videos is a marine biologist and shark researcher, Johanna Kohler, based in the Cayman Islands. As part of the non-profit collaboration, Shark Conservation Cayman, Johanna studies the local shark population which is also part of her PhD. Her shark research interests include shark behaviour and ecology, shark reproduction and human-shark conflict mitigation. By becoming a Sharkphoria Patron, anyone can now step into Johanna’s world and join her on the journey to a PhD in shark research as she is not only sharing fun, science based shark video tutorials, but also exclusive insights and first hand experiences. Sharks are one of the most misunderstood creatures.  Many people fear sharks as a result of blockbuster movies and sensationalizing media.  Media, which continues to give sharks a negative reputation, doesn’t help.  According to Johanna, sharks are not something to be feared, but rather respected. What is truly …

Shark Tales: 5 Common Shark Myths Debunked

We have all heard our fair share of “Shark Tales”.  These tales have certainly added to the allure, mystery and intrigue around sharks.  The many misconceptions of sharks have led to a myriad of rumours and myths about them some of which keep feeding into the public fear.  Over time, thanks to shark research, many popular shark myths have been debunked.  More and more organizations and media are beginning to share actual shark facts which, rather than add to the mystery, make it clear that sharks deserve our respect and not fear. Below we are sharing 5 popular common myths about sharks debunked.   5 Popular Shark Myths Debunked 1. Will a shark drown if it stops swimming? This popular myth does not apply to all species of sharks. Sharks will sink to the sea floor if they stop moving but, depending on the species, they may not drown. That being said, most species of sharks would in fact drown if they were to stop moving.  The constant forward movement together with a slightly opened …

Protecting the Sharks of the Cayman Islands

Sharks play an integral role in protecting the balance of coral reef ecosystems and the marine environment.  Since April 2015, the National Conservation Law provides protection for sharks and rays in the Cayman Islands.  Provisions under the National Conservation Law effectively make Cayman Waters a sharks and rays sanctuary.  All shark species are protected in the entire Cayman Waters including, coastal and offshore.  This year marks the 3rd anniversary of protecting sharks and rays in the Cayman Islands.  Shark conservation efforts continue to remain a priority as sharks are an invaluable species to our island’s marine environment and coral reef ecosystems.  There are 8 species of sharks that can be regularly found in Cayman waters including: Great Hammerhead, Lemon Shark, Caribbean Reef Shark, Blacktip, Tiger Shark, Oceanic Whitetip, Silky Shark, and Nurse Stark.  Some species of sharks found in Cayman waters reside all year long inhabiting coastal waters.  Whereas, other species of sharks are pelagic and seasonally pass through Cayman while on migratory routes.   The Cayman Islands is synonymous with marine tourism and famous …

Environmental Career Opportunity: The Department of Environment, Cayman Islands

For those of you who are passionate about protecting the environment and have a background in communications and/or marketing there is a fantastic job opportunity with the Cayman Islands Department of Environment (DOE) available.  This job opportunity allows you to merge your dedication for conservation and raising awareness about environmental issues with your creative talents to help create a positive impact in the Cayman Islands community. About the DOE: “The DoE works to facilitate responsible management and sustainable use of the natural environment and resources of the Cayman Islands through various environmental protection and conservation programmes and strategies.” –DOE The Department of Environment invites applications for the position of Public Education and Outreach Officer.  CLOSING DATE: Friday February 23rd 2018, click this link to view further details on job description and application  http://www.gov.ky/portal/page/portal/cighome/government/jobs/vacancies?p_id=9999294&p_pagegroupid=1142.   Photo Credit: Johanna Kohler

PWC Ocean Awareness Week: Saving Sharks

PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PWC) kicks off their second annual Ocean Awareness Week on Sunday, 19th November 2017.  In the spirit of ocean advocacy PWC’s employees are showing their love for the ocean and commitment to ocean awareness by competing with one another in a series of Ocean Friendly Challenges.  Bonus! This year, they are extending an invitation to community of the Cayman Islands to take the challenge to raise ocean awareness whether as an individual, with friends and family or with your colleagues.  In addition, PWC’s Ocean Awareness Week would like to use this opportunity to raise awareness for sharks.  In particular, they would like to highlight the dedicated hard work and commitment to protect sharks by the Cayman Islands Department of Environment through their Cayman Islands Shark Project. Cayman Islands Shark Project By Dept. of Environment and Marine Conservation International. The Cayman Islands Sharks Project provides information leading to a greater understanding, both locally and regionally, of the need to conserve these species and the environment on which they depend. With the help of acoustic tags, …

10 things you didn’t know about Cayman’s sharks

Today’s feature is a guest post by Johanna Kohler. 1. Little Cayman and Brac escape. Some individuals of our Caribbean reef shark population travel between Grand Cayman, Little Cayman and Cayman Brac.  A female Caribbean reef shark which was tagged in 2013 in Grand Cayman traveled regularly to Little Cayman and Cayman Brac over the next 3 years before its tag died in 2015. 2. What’s your name? • Bash Brothers and Little Basher – Bro action The Bash Brothers are two male sharks in East End of Grand Cayman. They like to swim together, one behind the other on the edge of the wall. Recently a smaller male shark has joined the team – hence “Little Basher”. One of the Bash Brothers has a distinctive scar on its gills. Some days they may be inquisitive on other days they may ignore you. When you go diving within their home range they may show up. • Scarlet/Smudge – the friendly Caribbean reef shark Scarlet, also known as Smudge, is an old local at East End …