All posts tagged: shark conservation

Shark Tales: 5 Common Shark Myths Debunked

We have all heard our fair share of “Shark Tales”.  These tales have certainly added to the allure, mystery and intrigue around sharks.  The many misconceptions of sharks have led to a myriad of rumours and myths about them some of which keep feeding into the public fear.  Over time, thanks to shark research, many popular shark myths have been debunked.  More and more organizations and media are beginning to share actual shark facts which, rather than add to the mystery, make it clear that sharks deserve our respect and not fear. Below we are sharing 5 popular common myths about sharks debunked.   5 Popular Shark Myths Debunked 1. Will a shark drown if it stops swimming? This popular myth does not apply to all species of sharks. Sharks will sink to the sea floor if they stop moving but, depending on the species, they may not drown. That being said, most species of sharks would in fact drown if they were to stop moving.  The constant forward movement together with a slightly opened …

Why Shark Week?

  Eco Chic Cayman is proud to team up with Shark Conservation Cayman for our second annual “Shark Week.” Last year our collaboration aimed to accompany Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” with real information that is relevant to Cayman and our community. We shared interesting facts about our local sharks and conservation efforts and Cayman loved it. That being said, we are excited to share all new content to celebrate “Shark Week” in Cayman this year. Shark Conservation Cayman’s mission is “To better understand Cayman’s shark populations and to raise awareness of the importance of sharks to healthy reefs and the marine environment”. The research and conservation efforts are supported by the White Tip Conservation Fund from the Cayman Islands Brewery. Read more about the collaboration, between the Cayman Islands Department of Environment and Marine Conservation International, and their work on their brand new website. Each day of the following week, July 22-28, we will feature a new collaborative blog post sharing interesting shark facts, debunked myths about sharks, the latest in local shark conservation initiatives …

Protecting the Sharks of the Cayman Islands

Sharks play an integral role in protecting the balance of coral reef ecosystems and the marine environment.  Since April 2015, the National Conservation Law provides protection for sharks and rays in the Cayman Islands.  Provisions under the National Conservation Law effectively make Cayman Waters a sharks and rays sanctuary.  All shark species are protected in the entire Cayman Waters including, coastal and offshore.  This year marks the 3rd anniversary of protecting sharks and rays in the Cayman Islands.  Shark conservation efforts continue to remain a priority as sharks are an invaluable species to our island’s marine environment and coral reef ecosystems.  There are 8 species of sharks that can be regularly found in Cayman waters including: Great Hammerhead, Lemon Shark, Caribbean Reef Shark, Blacktip, Tiger Shark, Oceanic Whitetip, Silky Shark, and Nurse Stark.  Some species of sharks found in Cayman waters reside all year long inhabiting coastal waters.  Whereas, other species of sharks are pelagic and seasonally pass through Cayman while on migratory routes.   The Cayman Islands is synonymous with marine tourism and famous …

PWC Ocean Awareness Week: Saving Sharks

PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PWC) kicks off their second annual Ocean Awareness Week on Sunday, 19th November 2017.  In the spirit of ocean advocacy PWC’s employees are showing their love for the ocean and commitment to ocean awareness by competing with one another in a series of Ocean Friendly Challenges.  Bonus! This year, they are extending an invitation to community of the Cayman Islands to take the challenge to raise ocean awareness whether as an individual, with friends and family or with your colleagues.  In addition, PWC’s Ocean Awareness Week would like to use this opportunity to raise awareness for sharks.  In particular, they would like to highlight the dedicated hard work and commitment to protect sharks by the Cayman Islands Department of Environment through their Cayman Islands Shark Project. Cayman Islands Shark Project By Dept. of Environment and Marine Conservation International. The Cayman Islands Sharks Project provides information leading to a greater understanding, both locally and regionally, of the need to conserve these species and the environment on which they depend. With the help of acoustic tags, …

A Call to Action: Help Shark Conservation. Adopt a Shark.

As custodians of our stunning coral reefs and charismatic marine life, for over 30 years the Cayman Islands Department of Environment (DOE) has been protecting our island’s precious marine environment by establishing marine parks. Since 2015, the DOE increased marine protection by designating Cayman’s waters as a sharks and rays sanctuary, under the National Conservation Law. In part of DOE’s shark conservation efforts, shark research is an ongoing project to gather data about Cayman’s shark populations and monitor their behavior and patterns. Additionally, CayBrew’s Whitetip Fund supports DOE’s shark project with a focus on tagging sharks to improve shark research and conservation efforts in the Cayman Islands. The shark project utilizes four methods as a means to comprehensively gather pertinent data about Cayman’s sharks. The methods used are: tagging with an acoustic transmitter, BRUV (baited remote underwater video) surveys, photo identification of individual sharks and shark sighting logging. To read more about this ongoing project click here Sharks are of significant value to our coral reefs and other marine environments. According to a report by …

Sharks of the Cayman Islands

The Cayman Islands are known for being a popular diving destination in the Caribbean with over 365 dive sites. Some of the main attractions of dive sites in the Cayman Islands include wreck diving at famous shipwrecks such as, the Kittiwake, the Balboa, the Oro Verde as well as our biodiverse reefs. In order to help maintain our status as a diving destination hotspot, the Cayman Islands for over 30 years, has been protecting its marine life and reefs with Marine Parks. In 2015, the Cayman Islands increased their ocean conservation as the National Conservation Law effectively put protection measures in place for sharks and rays. Sharks are an apex predator, at the top of the marine food chain, as a result they regulate the species at lower down the chain levels, helping to keep marine ecosystems such as reefs balanced. Sharks therefore are a considerable asset to our islands reefs and other marine ecosystems. Additionally, sharks are beneficial to ecotourism as many visiting snorkelers and divers are keen to see large charismatic marine life, …